Every person with Down’s Syndrome is unique; an individual with his or her own characteristics and personalities. Their condition should not define them.

 

Down’s Syndrome, also known as Trisomy 21, means that a person is born with an extra 21st chromosome.

 

Children with Down’s Syndrome will have a degree of learning disability however most will learn to read and write, and attend mainstream school; they should therefore be offered the same opportunities as a typical child.

 

A number of health conditions are associated with Down’s Syndrome however with the appropriate treatment and medical intervention, many children will overcome them.

 

Most adults with Down’s Syndrome lead independent, fulfilling lives with college, employment and relationships a reality.

 

Thanks to the wealth of support and therapy now available, the negative perceptions and stereotypes of Down’s Syndrome are out of date and don’t reflect the lives of our children today. 

If you’d like to read more about Down’s Syndrome, please visit:

What is Down’s Syndrome?